Loose Ends

I’ve been frustrating myself all year so far, trying to push through exhaustion and work drama to start creating again. It hasn’t been going well.

I finally put some time aside to write a new post yesterday, and ended up staring at my wall for two hours.

And then I was hungry.

And then I needed to pee.

And then I was cold.

And then I gave up writing, bundled up in my blanket, and took a nap.

This blanket, I made for myself three years ago as an anchor piece for my then goal of moving out of my uncle’s house and getting my first place on my own.

I was an avid user of Pinterest at the time, and envisioned the snazziest interior decorating in my dream space, and everything would be yellow and gray, clean and contemporary.

I crocheted this blanket over the course of a couple months and through a rewatch of three seasons of 30 Rock. It’s roughly six feet tall and wide, and it reminded me to save up every day I saw it draped across my bed.

I finally got my apartment, moved out, and it has been the staple piece of the house for the past two and a half years. But I realized something yesterday.

I never finished that blanket.

There’s always that one part of your passion that you hate to do. Art isn’t all fun and sunshine, it is actual work sometimes. And when it comes to knitting and crocheting, I absolutely detest sewing in ends when I’ve completed a project.

It’s arguably the most important part. The piece isn’t finished until you’ve sewn in the ends. It’s so crucial, it’s a common figure of speech.

Tieing in/up the loose ends.”

Where else where that have come from if not the fiber arts? I hate it though. I’m far from the only one, but I sure feel like the only one so hellbent in just leaving piles of old projects around that would otherwise be complete and ready to sell, should I just sew in the ends.

I’ve been using this blanket for the past three years with strands of yarn sticking out of every corner where the colors change, just ignoring the fact that my work is incomplete. Just acting like nothing is wrong with it. Glossing over my longstanding lack of follow-through.

You know how the question stands, does life imitate art, or does art imitate life? I’ve always found consistencies between my creative processes and my life happenings.  I feel like through this blanket, I have hexed my own life.

 

Why can’t I get a coherent thought on paper? Why do I have more drafts than published articles on this site? Why does it take me longer than two hours to put together one post? It shouldn’t take a whole day, a whole week, a whole month for one post! Why am I so scatterbrained?

This blanket was my anchor. It was my motivation to step into the next chapter. But I didn’t even finish it. Because I was too lazy. Because I didn’t feel like doing it.  But it was my first step. I brought the bad energy of sloth into my house and life with that shoddy first step.

Nothing gets finished.

I’m too tired to care.

All my plants are dead.

And I just keep wrapping up in this frayed blanket, wondering why. Wondering when it will get better.

Life imitates art. At least it seems to in this case. And I need to tie up some loose ends. A lot of loose ends. A lot of stupid pieces of thread all over the place, driving me insane and disturbing my qi.

I’m getting my qi back, one thread at a time. I’m 10 down so far, and when I’m done I’ll post a picture of the finally-finished blanket. And then we’ll see if I warded off the lazieness out of my house so I can write more frequently, not kill my new plants, and get my other creative endeavors rocking. I’m knocking out three strands of yarn per day, and I should be done in a couple weeks.

 

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Cupshe, A Public Service Announcerant

I don’t generally consider myself any more intelligent or knowledgeable than the average person I pass on the street. So it always throws me off when I discover that something I know isn’t common knowledge. But it seems I am discovering more and more that I was a friendless nerd growing up, and I sought the company of random and seldom useful data on the Internet more than that of my peers.

In any matter, I always feel morally…maybe civically obligated to share these things. So on that note, my cousin texted me.

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My family is going on a trip next month, and she sent me this picture of the outfit she was getting. It’s cute, and she said our other cousin ordered one too, and it might be fun if we all matched. She sent me a link to the site. She didn’t give me a direct link to the outfit for sale, only the home page. So I had to wander through the whole site to find this piece. And the more pages I clicked, the more I scrolled through, the more confidence I lost in this clothing company.

“Have you bought things from this site before,” I asked my cousin.

“No, but it seems pretty legit. I found it on Pinterest!”

Pretty…legit…

…Pinterest..

Legit…  

No.

So much…no.

Where do I begin? Well first off, I became initially skeptical because, as I started clicking on items, all of the pictures on the description page were blurry. How can you sell something as visual as fashion, and not feature clear imaging of what you’re selling? Every item for sale.cupshe-1Then… well, let me just show you a few photos.
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We have what looks like a professional fashion shoot photo, a kind of sexual photo of some oompa loompa tanned blonde chick, and a… a sweater. Just a sweater, chilling by itself.

Uhm, question.

How the feezy do these three pictures come from the same source? I’m supposed to believe that this is a reputable business? A business who posts bathroom selfies of garments for sale and believes that’s viable marketing? Surely we have not gotten that bad as a society yet. I mean, I know we’re close, but we can’t be there yet.

This was the point in time that I texted my cousin back and asked if she had purchased clothes from this site before. And she said no, but the photo of the outfit she bought was on Pinterest.

Because if it’s on the Internet, it must be legit, right?

Pinterest is a great website. You make a profile, and you can create pinboards to post your interests and catagorize them. It’s aesthetically nice, as you just endlessly scroll through nice pictures from other users that you follow, and repin what you like. You can add the Pinterest widget to your browser so if you like a picture from anywhere on the Net, you can immediately pin it to one of your boards on the platform. And the cool thing is, each pinned picture is actually a saved hyperlink to the webpage it originated from. That’s why it’s so great for the crafty among us. Recipes, needlework patterns, shopping, fitness routines, beauty how-tos, whatever! You can go back to them whenever you want by just clicking your pin later on.

What?

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How could you tell I’ve been a member of Pinterest since it began, back when you needed to be invited and only considered to join after a social media background check?

So why is “I got it from Pinterest,” then, not a legitimate excuse to purchase anything online?

Because Pinterest, while it likes to act as though it is more sophisticated and classy than other websites, gets its content from us. Just like every other social media platform. 

And we, as the mass populace, don’t do things right, and have the collective intelligence level: stupid

That will always be the downfall of social media. The users generate the content, and people are generally morons. Pinterest worked hard for years to screen their members and educate its users of plagiarism, copyright, and sourcing, and of course people still pinned images from Google, or didn’t cite sources of content, or didn’t question the validity of the sites they visited for these pins. And over time, when it comes to buying things and using Pinterest to find what you want, the site has effectively become the Wikipedia of eCommerce. Just because it’s there, doesn’t mean it’s true.

Now then, so far we have a sketchy source, an even sketchier display of product, and I’m still ranting, so what else is wrong? Well with all of those red flags, I decided to research reviews of the website.

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But let me stop being mean. There are some positive reviews…

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…in broken English.

It is with the legitimacy and trustings. I am the convinced.

I digress. Anyways, it took me a whole two minutes to find all of this information. It’s so easy to look things up online that it pains me to discover that people just don’t. Or don’t even think to, or find something off about these Chinese discount fashion websites. I feel like getting sucked into these things is today’s equivalent of getting conned by Nigerian princes emailing you for help. You should know better.

I mean, you can go ahead and take your chances. I’ve purchased plenty of things from Chinese sellers that seemed too good to be true. But I at least knew I was taking a risk, and that the best case scenario is generally that I get something of okay to low quality, maybe on time. Anyone buying things with the highest expectations, because they saw it on Pinterest, kinda deserves the L.

UPDATE: Luckily, my cousins did in fact receive their packages in time for our trip to Cuba. I’d consider them some of the few success stories, so huzzah. I instead, opted to have my aunt make me a similar cover up so I could kinda still join my cousins in the whole matching thing. It came out amazing.

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Handmade wrap skirt, courtesy of @2ChicDesigns!

TL;DR: Word to the wise, check the legitimacy of online shopping sites before you throw your money at them. And no, don’t take your inquiry to Pinterest. Hopefully happy online shopping to you all.